UVM to receive $30 million in Omnibus funding for the Honors College


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The University of Vermont is one of many organizations around Vermont receiving federal funding through the $1.7 trillion omnibus bill signed into law last week by President Joe Biden.A total of $30 million in Congressionally Directed Spending is coming to the university. “This endowment, the proceeds from it will support the quality of education that we offer, through the Honors College and across our colleges,” said Suresh Garimella, UVM’s president.The school will use money in the Honor College. Plans on how to use it will be developed once the school has the funds.“We will deploy these funds in a manner that best supports the quality of education for our students,” Garimella said. “We’ve been very focused on affordability and access at UVM, we’ve frozen tuition for five years in a row.”University researchers will be competing for an additional $50 million in federal funding. For initiatives like Institutes for Rural Partnerships, food systems research on small and medium-sized farms and Rural Centers of Excellence on Addiction.“The federal government’s role in funding basic research, especially at land grant institutions is critical because it leads to breakthroughs in research that have deep societal impacts,” Garimella said. “It advances technology, involves medicine and solves global challenges.”Now retired Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) played a crucial role in securing the funds, as the chair for the Senate Appropriation Committee.“His legacy, and his impact on the university, is so significant that I think it’s hard to quantify, and that’s true of all of Vermont,” Garimella said.Other than the college, Vermont’s congressional delegation directed more than $212 million to over 100 organizations in the state. The organizations range from natural preservation to workforce development to education and child care.

The University of Vermont is one of many organizations around Vermont receiving federal funding through the $1.7 trillion omnibus bill signed into law last week by President Joe Biden.

A total of $30 million in Congressionally Directed Spending is coming to the university.

“This endowment, the proceeds from it will support the quality of education that we offer, through the Honors College and across our colleges,” said Suresh Garimella, UVM’s president.

The school will use money in the Honor College. Plans on how to use it will be developed once the school has the funds.

“We will deploy these funds in a manner that best supports the quality of education for our students,” Garimella said. “We’ve been very focused on affordability and access at UVM, we’ve frozen tuition for five years in a row.”

University researchers will be competing for an additional $50 million in federal funding. For initiatives like Institutes for Rural Partnerships, food systems research on small and medium-sized farms and Rural Centers of Excellence on Addiction.

“The federal government’s role in funding basic research, especially at land grant institutions is critical because it leads to breakthroughs in research that have deep societal impacts,” Garimella said. “It advances technology, involves medicine and solves global challenges.”

Now retired Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) played a crucial role in securing the funds, as the chair for the Senate Appropriation Committee.

“His legacy, and his impact on the university, is so significant that I think it’s hard to quantify, and that’s true of all of Vermont,” Garimella said.

Other than the college, Vermont’s congressional delegation directed more than $212 million to over 100 organizations in the state.

The organizations range from natural preservation to workforce development to education and child care.


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