3-K provider ‘way less anxious’ after city payments began


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Earlier this year, Sasha Maslouski feared she might have to shut down her home-based child care center, Snapdragon Place, after going weeks without getting paid by the city for the 3-K classes she was providing.

“Every day I’m waking up and I’m going to sleep thinking about how much longer we can stay on,” she told NY1 in October.

Maslouslki’s contract was finally registered on Oct. 19, the same day her story aired on NY1, and dozens of her colleagues rallied at City Hall before a City Council hearing.


What You Need To Know

  • Earlier this year, 3-K providers rallied at City Hall, saying they were not getting paid by the city for the classes they were providing
  • Sasha Maslouski feared she might have to shut down her home-based child care center, Snapdragon Place
  • After a NY1 story aired in October, Maslouski’s contract was finally registered and she’s since been paid

About 10 days later, a deposit of 30% of the school year’s budget arrived.

“That really of course eased things up, because I didn’t have to worry about payroll, I didn’t have to worry about supplies, I didn’t have to worry about rent insurance, so that definitely helped a lot,” Maslouski said in December.

Parents do not pay for the city’s universal 3-K or pre-K classes. Instead, the city foots the bill, paying community-based organizations, child care organizations and home-based center operators to run the classes.

But for weeks, Maslouski, and many other providers who rallied alongside her, had to front the cost of her operation, with no reimbursement from the city.

She says she knows some providers who are still awaiting any payments, and others who canceled their contracts.

Moving forward, she’ll be reimbursed after filing invoices.

She hasn’t received payment for September or October invoices, but she’s confident she will.

“It looks like things are moving, it looks like they’re trying, it looks like there’s something going on. I am definitely way less anxious, way stressed out,” Maslouski said.

She’s not sure that would have happened without providers like her speaking out.

“It pains me to say this, but it feels like a lot of it has to do with the fact that we all collectively got really upset and we all collectively pushed for attention,” she said.

Maslouski is hopeful the education department will work collaboratively with providers to get feedback and tweak the process in the future.


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